The UK property sector has been halted following bank appeals

With the pandemic still going, UK's housing market comes to a halt

In light of this present coronavirus pandemic, the United Kingdom government has reacted by suspending the nation’s housing market on Thursday. Preventing estate representatives from placing new houses in the marketplace. Also, preventing visits from prospective buyers to properties currently available for sale.

Banks Call for Action

The authorities’ responses are a direct outcome of banks begging to suspend the UK housing market after discussions involving ministers and lenders.

Banks are worried about the virus’ effect on valuations and their capacity to give credit once the market is facing a recession.

Ministers have been advised it is not feasible to survey properties and bank call centers. Also have been bombarded with calls from anxious homeowners calling for mortgage vacations.

After advocating buyers and sellers to postpone moving briefly, the government has implemented a blanket ban on transferring houses throughout the country-wide isolation interval.

Declaration

Officials declared that one can chat with estate agents and they will be able to give general guidance on the local property market and address. As well as solve any problems directly but they will not be able to specifically start selling homes as usual.

Lenders have agreed to expand the distance of time borrowers need to pay mortgages to be able to stop transactions that are in process from failing.

Normally, mortgage offers are deemed valid for no less than 3 months. However, for clients who have traded contracts, they are going to have the liberty to extend the deal to their mortgage for a further few months so they can proceed to move in later in the year.

Laura Conduit, a property lawyer from Farrer, stated that some issues will depend on the niceness of some people. Especially if someone already has exchanged or has a completion date since from a legal viewpoint they need to compete on that day.

She added that banks would need to choose whether their credit teams may depend on valuations which are created from seeing video footage of estates instead of using surveyors.